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AMERICUS-SUMTER HIGH NORTH CAMPUS WELCOMES WELLS FARGO BANK
AMERICUS-SUMTER HIGH NORTH CAMPUS WELCOMES WELLS FARGO BANK

WELLS FARGO VISITS AMERICUS SUMTER HIGH NORTH CAMPUS TO SHARE BANKING SKILLS
Vicki Goodman, Wells Fargo store manager, and Rodrick Gunn, teller, taught more than 60 students at Americus-Sumter High School about saving and money on Thursday, April 26, using the Hands on Banking financial education curriculum.

“Young people should understand that the money habits they develop today can affect the rest of their lives,” said Awale Rage, community bank president. “At Wells Fargo, we want to help all our young people succeed financially. We hope these students develop good life-long financial practices from what they learned.”

“I am so grateful that Wells Fargo took the time to invest in the future of our students by educating them on financial responsibility,” said Janet Lucas, Social Studies teacher and department chair at Americus-Sumter High School.

Similar activities took place across the country as part of the annual American Bankers Association’s Teach Children to Save program, which is an annual campaign created by the American Bankers Association Education Foundation.

Customized for various age groups from children to adults, Wells Fargo’s Hands on Banking® program is fun, interactive and teaches fundamental money management basics that are crucial to achieving financial success. Parents and teachers can find the free program online at http://www.handsonbanking.org.

Wells Fargo’s money tips for parents of young children
1. Set Goals — Have children list all the things they want and the anticipated cost.
2. Open a Savings Account— Around age 5, children begin to understand the process of managing money. That’s a good time to open a savings account with them.
3. Pay a Modest Allowance — Try a dollar a week, or a set amount, for each year of the child’s age. More important than how much is that everyone understands the rules up front – including the completion of necessary chores – and that you pay the allowance consistently and on time.
4. Make a Plan for Spending, Saving and Giving — Encourage children to divide their allowance and any additional earnings three ways: money for spending, money for saving, and money for giving to charity.
5. Use Free Resources — There are many free and reputable places where you can find helpful guidance to teach children about saving and finances. These include your public library or Hands on Banking/El futuro en tus manos®, a parent-tested, parent-approved program available free at handsonbanking.org or elfuturoentusmanos.com.





 
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